Archived Resources from Funding The Next Generation 

Section 1. Local children’s fund measures, campaigns and polls in California

Campaigns for local children’s funds in California

March 2020

CITY OF SACRAMENTO – Voter-initiated set-aside of general fund

ALAMEDA COUNTY – Sales tax for early care and Oakland Children’s Hospital

2018

ALAMEDA COUNTY EARLY CARE CAMPAIGN FOR JUNE 2018

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY MARIJUANA TAX MEASURE – November 2018

CITY OF RICHMOND – Budget set-aside to create a Youth Fund, June 2018 + Real Estate Transfer Tax, November 2018

SANTA CRUZ City and County – Increasing a city marijuana tax to create a Children’s Fund and utilizing marijuana resources to create a county early care initiative

SAN FRANCISCO, June 2018

YOLO, Marijuana general tax measure calling out kids

Update on Local First 5 Commissions

Emerging for the Future

POMONA CHARTER AMENDMENT – See poster

YOLO COUNTY PRESCHOOL INITIATIVE – Increasing sales tax through voter initiative

LONG BEACH – Invest in Youth Survey Results from Khmer Girls in Action

Ballot measure language for California children and youth funds – No need to re-invent the wheel

ONE-PAGER: Drafting a dedicated funding measure – one-page summary created by Funding the Next Generation on elements of a funding measure

DECISION POINTS in drafting a measure

EXAMPLES: (See above for Alameda, Richmond, Sacramento, and most recent San Francisco)

Polling on funding measures for children and youth services – getting essential information on what the public thinks

Local polls and polling information with a local perspective

Statewide

National perspective

Early organizing from around the state

San Francisco – 2 model measures: California’s first children’s fund and only universal preschool fund

Children’s Fund information

Preschool for All information

History of early care local funding efforts in the Bay Area

  • Summary – prepared by Ellen Dektar, Alameda County

2016 children’s fund campaign information

Information on running political campaigns

NOTE: Most of the information on campaigns is in our campaign manual, linked here: https://www.fundingthenextgeneration.org/nextgenwp/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Funding-the-Next-Generation-September2017-small.pdf

Section 2. Taxes and Revenue Options for a local Children and Youth Fund

Drafting a measure: Laws, fiscal opportunities and process

SUMMARY AND WORKSHEET

Examples of dedicated revenue streams – one-page chart on revenue options, created by Funding the Next Generation

Decision matrix for developing a local dedicated funding stream

WHAT’S LEGAL? Local Government Funding Options for California’s Children, Youth and Family Services  – a white paper prepared by Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.  This is the best overview of the legal options for creating new revenue streams for children and youth services in California.  It is a little outdated in that it does not include marijuana taxes, but it is a solid resource for basic information.

INNOVATIVE FINANCING IDEAS – from Children’s Funding Project

FUNDING OUR FUTUREReport on Generating State and Local Tax Revenue for Quality Early Care and Education by Build Initiative, Center for American Progress, Childrens Funding Project, U of Maryland, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

OTHER RESOURCES FROM FNG CONFERENCE

Marijuana taxes – California’s most recent potential funding stream

Other resources on marijuana

Soda taxes

NOTE! Local soda taxes are no longer legal in California, as a result of a “deal” made by the California legislature with the American Beverage Association and signed by the Governor on June 28, 2018.  The ban will be in place until 2030.

“Big soda” held California hostage in a move that can only be described as shameful blackmail.  The soda industry first funded a signature drive for a terrible measure for the November, 2018 ballot – a measure which would never again allow any local tax to pass with less than a 2/3 vote; and then told the Legislature that it would remove the measure from the ballot if local soda taxes were declared illegal in the state until 2030.  This is a vivid example of the influence of corporate money destroying democracy.

Link to LA Times article on the “deal.”

We have kept the following articles on the website for your information.  The video on the Berkeley campaign is particularly interesting in that it describes a model grassroots campaign.  The lessons are relevant to all types of grassroots campaigns.

Section 3. Tools to Help with Planning and Strategizing

!Brilliant toolkit on local organizing for funding children’s services

Making the fiscal case for investing in children

Youth Engagement

Communication tips

Creating a local Children’s Budget – an important step in getting more money for kids

What is a Children’s Budget?  It can include many things, but its essence is a resource map of funding for children’s services.

How to map the resources in your local budget – This can be a year-long project, or several months, or less.  We recommend analyzing what you need to take next steps, getting all the help from public officials possible, and doing it as quickly as it takes to accomplish your goal.

WEBINAR ON UNDERSTANDING CALIFORNIA COUNTY BUDGETS, with Chris Hoene, ED California Policy and Budget Center; Ed Harrington, former Controller of San Francisco; and Margaret Brodkin, Director, Funding the Next Generation – July, 2017

Other tools for mapping resources:

Budget advocacy – fighting for money for kids through the local budget process

Examples of Children’s Budgets and Children’s Bills of Rights

Cities and Counties in California

Cities around the country

National and state

Other Planning Tools – created by Funding the Next Generation

Section 4. State and National Information

Statewide issues and policies that impact local revenue challenges and opportunities

GOOD NEWS: CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT CASE THAT COULD IMPACT VOTER THRESHOLD NEEDED WITH VOTER-INITIATED TAXES – August 2017

In June, 2018, San Francisco became the first local community to test the California Supreme Court opinion that local revenue measures put on the ballot by voter-initiatives were different from those put on the ballot by elected officials, and that the same constraints on revenue measures did not apply.  Many concluded that meant local revenue measures placed on the ballot through signatures would need only a majority vote, rather than 2/3.  THIS IS A GAME-CHANGER for local communities and advocates proposing important revenue streams for needed services.  San Francisco’s Department of Elections certified as wins two revenue measures (one for childcare and the other for teacher salaries) that received 50.3% and 60% respectively.  San Francisco is prepared to defend any potential lawsuit.

GOOD NEWS/BAD NEWS: SODA INDUSTRY TAKES CALIFORNIA HOSTAGE AND LEGISLATURE BANS SODA TAXES – IN EXCHANGE FOR TAXPAYER BALLOT MEASURE THAT WOULD REQUIRE A 2/3 VOTE FOR ALL LOCAL TAXES BEING REMOVED FROM THE BALLOT.

IN THE FUTURE: STATEWIDE BALLOT MEASURE TO CLOSE PROP 13 LOOPHOLE AND FUND SCHOOLS AND LOCAL SERVICES

California revenue and tax information

California’s laws are complicated and fully understanding all aspects of local revenue takes time.  Sometimes it’s just best to rely on financial and legal experts.  Funding the Next Generation will help you with that.  Meanwhile, we recommend the following as the best sources of information:

National Perspective

Dedicated funding streams around the country beyond California

Section 5. More about Funding the Next Generation

June 25, 2018 Conference in Los Angeles

General information on Funding the Next Generation

Lessons learned

Newsletters – A Good Summary of Our Work and Lessons Learned

  • March/April 2020 – Report on election results and Feb. 26 Statewide Convening
  • October 2019 – Summary of Second National Institute
  • July 2019 – Summary of Court hearing on voter threshold
  • May 2019 – Open Letter to Governor and Measure updates
  • December 2018 – Summary and Lessons from November 2018 Measures for Children’s Funding
  • July 2018 – Summary of June 2018 Ballot Measures for Children’s Funding
  • November 2017 – Updates on Alameda, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, marijuana, state measures impacting local taxing
  • INTERESTING! October 2017 – Summary of communications training by Shenker-Osario, Brookings national report on children’s funds, and our new campaign manual
  • February 2017 – Reflections on 2016 children’s fund campaigns, summary of outcomes and learnings
  • May 2016 – Report on statewide conference, lessons learned, keynote by Newsom, perspectives of local elected officials on children’s funds
  • January 2016 – Report on San Joaquin Bill of Rights, advice from political consultant Nicole Derse

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